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york and across the country. is the attitude about urban education and how many kids we are losing their are not graduating from schools. basically saying, we have an issue here we have to deal with. i try to discuss that with other mayors across the state and with the decision makers. we have to come up with solutions. it is a burden for a lot of cities, not just school taxes but property taxes and trying to balance the budget to provide the services needed. this are two major problems. this is a very old city. we have a lot of beautiful historic buildings. and in many ways when people do not take care of them, it is hard to keep them on the tax rolls or make sure people invest in them. basically, i have been through five governors in my 19 years as the mayor. i deal directly with the governors and the people in the senate and the assembly. we talk about the state capital which was tax -- 74% tax exempt. a lot of it was a result of the state taking over a large percentage of our city. a lot of it was non for profits. i have had a good working relationship with people in the state
, gosh. i would lean towards jeb at this piont because he has really been pushing education. right now, he's got me. host: stephen, who did you vote for in 2008? in 2012.ean caller: i voted for president obama. i really liked mitt romney. why do i have to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? that really bugged me. host: that is stephen from connecticut. tyrone is a republican from the bronx. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate in 2016. i think she handled the middle eastern issue to the best of her ability. also, as far as the gop is concerned, i think she has made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with private entities and organizations that are coming out of the woodwork. i was watching earlier today and what they were requesting from the white house was let's fix this problem by incorporating a small businesses and less government intervention to curb the deficit. it has been astronomical. then i heard barack obama say the way we are going to do it is by making more cuts in various ways. he was saying by
for the federal government in education. if we want one, we need to pass an amendment to the constitution to do it. now, he was for changing the constitution to get a role for education. but he said how is it that we have all these teacher training programs run by the federal government costing billion dollars a year run out of washington to train teachers who are actually a local and community and state responsibility? how'd we get there? and, oh, by the way, does anybody know if they're actually improving teacher training? actually improving the skills of our teachers? so there's really two questions. one is what's the constitutional role of the federal government in that and, number two, if there's a legitimate role -- or even if there isn't, you're spending the money -- shouldn't you know, shouldn't when we pass this say here's the metrics which we're going to use to measure whether or not a teacher's effective or whether the teacher training programs are effective? >> host: this month on our booktv "in depth" program, senator tom coburn, who is also a medical doctor and an author. he wrote "t
equipment, in r&d, in science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people, sir, don't want to consider is where do we get those resources with those enormous debts? i asked our research department if they would make a reasonable prediction of how important interest costs would be if we did nothing, and their estimate without any explosion in interest rates was as follows: within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of the gdp to 12% of the gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d, science education and infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will have assured that we're going to have what i call a slow growth crisis. and that's at least my way of formulating what happens if we don't do anything. but, mike, please, take over. this is your meeting, not mine. >> well, one of the things i don't claim to be here is an economics expert, although it's from a national security standpoint, and i've felt this way for years, that it's not just about the health of our economy, it's around the world, it's the health of eco
say the american taxpayer helps subsidize their education because many of them receive world-class training at our public and private colleges and universities, and then reluctantly return home to pursue their careers because they can't get a visa or can't get a green card here in america. we are cultivating human capital and then sending those individuals back home. now, this is an area where there is broad, broad support. my colleague, senator moran, recently wrote a letter, had a "dear colleague" letter which points out that roughly -- well, he cites in the letter that more than three-quarters of voters support a stem-type visa. he quotes in this letter, dated july 20, 2012, "87% of democrats polled, 72% of republicans polled and 65% of independents support the creation of a stem visa." and, of course, if you think about it, it's just common sense. why in the world would we want to subsidize the education of these students from other countries, train them in these highly specialized and highly desirable fields and then simply send them home? i've introduced legislation ove
, rats with fresh eyes. i've been amazed, enlightened, educated and contained by robert sullivan's books, none more so than "my american revolution." until i read bob's book i thought i was reasonably conversant for a college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. from what we all know and most massachusetts virginia and the carolinas. in which the heroic continental army barely survived the winter in valley forge pennsylvania. one after the other, bob demolishes these myths and gives a new war centered around lawrence county new jersey aunts -- yes, you heard me right. the mountains 80% of which was fought on a terrain of the empire state-building. truth be told however, as well as admiration i have a grievance with bob. both irish and brightest we both have grievances. i've been hurting deeply disappointed on a personal level that one of bob's books. five years ago in the fall of 2007 i reviewed howe to get rich, the common room magazine and i praised it as quote a profoundly funny book. a year later in the fall of 2008 in the midst of an act of collective subtlety in
with fresh eyes. i have been amazed, enlightened, educated, entertained. none more so than my american revolution. until i read his book, i thought i was reasonably conversant for college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. the war we all know, but mostly in massachusetts, virginia, and the carolinas. war in which the high road, no army barely survived an epic the punishing winter in valley forge pennsylvania. one after the other pump demolishes these myths and gives us an award centered around morristown new jersey and the watch on mountain. yes, you heard me right. i wore a% of which was fought on a terrain visible from the top of the empire state building. truth be told, however, as well as admiration, i have a grievance upon with both -- we're both irish and writers so we have to have grievances. i have been heard and deeply disappointed and a personal level by juan ponce books. five years ago in the fall of 2007i reviewed how not to get rich. i praised it as a profoundly funny book. a year later in the fall of 2008 in the midst of an act of collective 70 in whi
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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